Understanding the Importance of Ethical Dilemma with False Confessions

Jr. Phillip Neely, Amanda Dunstan

Abstract


The purpose of this article is to gain a better understanding of the ethical dilemma of false confessions that are created from the use of deceptive interrogation tactics. First, this article will explore various types of interrogation tactics that are used by law enforcement and assess those tactics' ability to influence the suspect in providing a false confession. The various interrogatory tactics that are used by law enforcement in the United States will be analyzed, including the deceptive interrogatory tactics used with the Reid-technique model. In addition, alternative interrogatory tactics, such as the PEACE model will be explored, along with assessing the use of the PEACE model tactics on decreasing the chances of false confessions. Secondly, this article will examine the different types of coercion that may be used in an investigation, such as inherent coercion and psychological manipulation. The ethical concerns regarding false confessions and how these confessions can easily be coerced will be examined. Additionally, the risks involved in creating a false memory with suspects during an interrogation will be discussed; consequently, there is a risk of creating a false memory that could lead to a false confession. Furthermore, the Innocence Project and other court cases that involved false confessions will be discussed. Finally, this article will examine a real life story of an innocent child who falsely confessed to the murder.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.11114/ijce.v1i2.3633

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International Journal of Contemporary Education

ISSN 2575-3177 (Print)   ISSN 2575-3185 (Online)

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